Skip to content
Sculpture of Scale

Sculpture of Scale

Long-Sharp Gallery, Indianapolis

2020/2021

An 80-page full color catalogue accompanied the gallery's exhibition, a celebration of large-scale works by 12 international sculptors.   As stated “…(sculptors) see in 3-D. They see positive and negative space. They feel curves and see how light reflects and refracts.”  

 

Charlie Kaplan: Contours

Charlie Kaplan: Contours

A Dialogue between the Artist and the Stone, Catalogue Essay by Sandra Kraskin

10/1/2019

Curving like mountains or waves, Charlie Kaplan’s sculptures echo the organic forms of nature. His work appears monumental whether it’s massive like Soaring, which rises nine feet, or much smaller like Black Slice, which is only 28 inches high. The marble, Kaplan’s favored material, imparts a timeless quality to his sculptures. It also provides a natural color that adds a unique beauty and a specific identity to each piece. As Kaplan, himself, explains, “My ideas come from the stone.” Because he carves directly, without a sketch as a guide, Kaplan is responding to the individual characteristics of each piece of stone, almost like he would to a spoken command. The stone is speaking to him, and he is following its imperatives.

Charlie Kaplan: Early Works

Charlie Kaplan: Early Works

Museo Gigi Guadagnucci

September/October 2016

The Museo Gigi Guadagnucci, in Massa-Carrara, Tuscany, presented a solo exhibition of early marble sculptures by Charlie Kaplan as part of its mission to showcase contemporary artists of international acclaim. Kaplan is the only Amerian artist to receive this honor.  The accompanying catalogue, featured essays by Massimo Bertozzi and Annette Rose-Shapiro.  As Ms. Rose Shapiro states “Kaplan’s artistry …can be summed up in the words of Lao-Tze who advised that to be strong one must stand like a mountain and flow like a great river.  Kaplan’s work embodies that very ideal.”

Charlie Kaplan

Charlie Kaplan

48 page catalogue, 2013

2013

Catalogue with essay by Christopher Eamon documents Kaplan’s work from 2009 through 2013. In his essay Material Seduction, Eamon states “Kaplan’s sculpture…is neither completely abstract nor definitively representational, a fact that links it to this formative time.”